A Three-Part Pattern

Like a pattern in a quilt or a repeating theme in music, so is this psalm. It’s made up of list of four needy groups of people; each of these have three parts to them.

The key to the first part of the pattern is the word “some” followed by very difficult times that these people have: 1) Wanderers from verse 4; 2) Prisoners, from verse 10 ; 3) Fools from verse 17; and 4) Sailors from verse 23.

The second part of the pattern is how these people cried out to God in their fear and distress. The third part begins with a verse that repeats itself at the end of these groups of people; it’s the verse for today.

The three-part pattern in this psalm is like life sometimes: trouble, crying for help and then God saving. Maybe there are times in your life when you were suffering, or in trouble, or afraid. Like the sacred writer of today’s psalm, maybe you placed your trust in God, prayed and then learned that everything turned out all right and you thanked and praised God. Perhaps you learned that God is more important than anything and that God is the answer to every problem.

Spend time praising God about God’s love and kindness to you. God is always ready to help us, but that help doesn’t get to us until we just let go of trying to make things happen ourselves and trust that God will make sure that goodness comes out of suffering.

Psalm 107:1-9

Here is a sample of a seven-syllable breath-prayer
from today’s reading:
Your love endures forever. v. 1
For more information about this creative way to pray, see Bible Breaths.

This is the Eighth Week in Epiphany
Winter in the north.  Year C
Wednesdays are dedicated to the Psalms

Seasons of Grace – A Calendar for 2019

Solar and Sacred Seasons
Some adjustments to make the church year simpler.

These Firestarters are from a new edition of The Bible Through the Seasons being developed for families with children. For the Firestarters in the original edition, I recommend the ebook.  You will have the entire program of well over a thousand Firestarters with you on your phone or tablet.  More information…

How does the Word touch you?

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