Yom Kippur

Saturdays: The Sabbath Torah Portions – Yom Kippur
Jonah

Click or touch “Firestarter”
Madeleine reads the one-minute Firestarter.

In the course of the years of seminary, God blessed me with the friendship of a cantor in the Reformed tradition, the late Sidney Venetianer. Along with his family, Sid became my life-long, devoted friend until his death in 1993. One Yom Kippur, I joined him in a complete fast of twenty-four hours, prescribed by the Torah for this day. That day sealed for me what has become a love for Judaism and a desire that we rediscover its profound rhythms for prayer, devotion to the Lord and openness to the ongoing flow of God into our lives.

The essence of the day is prayer and repentance, with the assurance that God is listening and merciful. It is a day of closeness in the Jewish Community, both those on earth and those beyond the grave, as remembrances of names of the community rise forth at the service on this day. It is a fitting day to visit a synagogue. Christians believe that the assurance of God’s forgiveness and atonement is in the love and sacrifice of Jesus.

The Book of Jonah is read in its entirety on this day. (You will find Firestarters for this book in the Eighth and Ninth Weeks of Pentecost, Year C.)

The Reading for Today
Text     Audio

Bible Breaths
What are these?
A day to pause and repent
The atoning blood of Christ
Never running from Your will
Joy in a forgiving God

Click or touch the image
for the version for children and families.

Saturdays are dedicated to the Sabbath Torah portions
read in synagogues throughout the world.
This plan follows those traditions that take a third of the portion
over a three year cycle, this year, the third part.
For more about the Torah portions and thoughtful commentaries, visit
The Jewish Theological Seminary.

Photo Courtesy – http://www.sacbee.com

A Sense Deeper than Feeling

Monday, July 22, 2013
Jonah 3—4

Click or touch “Firestarter”
To listen to Nick read the one-minute introduction.


http://juliemcallister.com/what-god-says/post-3/

Shall we try this again, Jonah? This man, who spends more time sulking than prophesying, finds himself back to square one. “What might happen if I avoid God’s will again? More nights in the belly of a whale? I think not!”

So it is that Jonah makes his way through Nineveh obeying the command from God, yet with no energy to do it. The people repent in grand style! Jonah’s anger flares up. Then he sulks again when the little bush withers up.

The Lord’s compassion is never-ending. The last verse is similar to the final words of Jesus on the cross: “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing” (Luke 23:34).

Be careful about sulking. Do God’s will, even when you do not feel like doing it. In the belly of your person, there is a sense deeper than feeling—you simply know what God is asking of you.

The Reading for Today
Text     Audio

Bible Breaths
Sitting, sackcloth on my soul 3:5
Gracious God, slow to anger 4:2
From sulking to surrender 4:8
Compassion for Ninevehs 4:11
For more about this way to pray, see “Daily Bible Breaths” in Resources.

Click or touch the image
for the version for children and families.

This is the eighth of thirteen weeks in Pentecost, Year C.
See “Solar and Sacred Seasons” in the menu above.
Mondays are dedicated to the Prophets,in this season the Minor Prophets.

Scripture Recordings in over 700 languages!
Faith Comes By Hearing

Audio Bible App from www.bible.is

The Firestarters and readings are posted in the timezone UTC+12, so that they are available in New Zealand and other regions near the International Date Line.

From the Belly

Monday, July 15, 2013
Jonah 1—2

Click or touch “Firestarter”
To listen to Nick read the one-minute introduction.


Jonah, by Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel.

God’s heart is warm and tender to Nineveh—Jonah’s is not. God singles out for salvation, this pagan capital of the empire that wreaked havoc on the Israelites from the ninth to the seventh centuries B.C. Jonah flees to Spain—the ends of the earth—refusing to be involved with God’s mercy on a city Jonah hates. However, wherever he goes, Jonah brings faith in the God of the Hebrews. The Phoenician sailors cry out to God whom they have come to know by someone avoiding doing God’s will. Even the great fish obeys and throws up!

God’s patience with the prophet rivals God’s patience with Nineveh. Is there something that you know way down in your own belly that you are called to do and are avoiding? Even greater than flight away from God’s will is God’s pursuit of you until you complete what God wants.

The Reading for Today
Text     Audio

Bible Breaths
Never fleeing from You, Lord 1:10
You answer from my distress. 2:2
My life brought up from the pit 2:6
My prayer coming before You 2:7
For more about this way to pray, see “Daily Bible Breaths” in Resources.

Click or touch the image
for the version for children and families.
Click or touch the image
for the version for children and families.

This is the seventh of thirteen weeks in Pentecost, Year C.
See “Solar and Sacred Seasons” in the menu above.
Mondays are dedicated to the Prophets,in this season the Minor Prophets.

Scripture Recordings in over 700 languages!
Faith Comes By Hearing

Audio Bible App from www.bible.is

The Firestarters and readings are posted in the timezone UTC+12, so that they are available in New Zealand and other regions near the International Date Line.

Yom Kippur

The Sabbath Torah Portion – Yom Kippur (The Day of Atonement)
The Book of Jonah

Nick reads the one-minute introduction.

In the course of the years of seminary, God blessed me with the friendship of a cantor in the Reformed tradition, the late Sidney Venetianer. Along with his family, Sid became my life-long, devoted friend until his death in 1993. One Yom Kippur, I joined him in a complete fast of twenty-four hours, prescribed by the Torah for this day. That day sealed for me what has become a love for Judaism and a desire that we rediscover its profound rhythms for prayer, devotion to the Lord and openness to the ongoing flow of God into our lives.

The essence of the day is prayer and repentance, with the assurance that God is listening and merciful. It is a day of closeness in the Jewish Community, both those on earth and those beyond the grave, as remembrances of names of the community rise forth at the service on this day. It is a fitting day to visit a synagogue. As Christians, we bring the assurance of God’s forgiveness and atonement in Jesus Christ.

The Book of Jonah is read in its entirety on this day.


Saturdays are dedicated to the Sabbath Torah portions
read in synagogues throughout the world.


Daily Bible Breaths


Version for Children and Families